Workaround: Barnes and Noble Nook e-reader app no longer available for PC, Mac #BarnesAndNoble

I discovered after a Mac OS X update that my very old Nook e-reader app for Mac OS X no longer works – and that Nook discontinued the app for PC and Mac desktops in 2013. Barnes and Noble says we should use their cloud-based/web-based app from a browser (presumably this means we must have an Internet connection in order to read?)

Problem 1 – Barnesandnoble.com Inaccessible

Unfortunately, an attempt to access the Barnes and Noble web site returns

This page is unavailable due to either geographic restrictions or other restrictions in place at this time. NOTE: other restrictions can be a result of our security platform detecting potential malicious activity. Please try again later as the restrictions may be lifted, or contact your service provider if the issue persists.

ID: 8387029820181080074

As best I can tell, this means Barnes and Noble has blocked our IP address for unknown reasons. Their recommended solution is to reboot our Internet access modem and/or attempt to request a new IP address. This is absurd. Our IP address works fine for accessing all other web sites.

Problem 2 – No Nook E-Reader app available – Work Around

If Barnes and Noble e-books can no longer be read on a PC or Mac, what can we do?

One solution is to install an Android emulator, and then install the Android B&N e-reader app in the emulated Android. An emulator is basically a simulator – it simulates and Android device but its really just software running on a PC or a Mac.

I installed the Nox Android emulator app on my Macbook. After dealing with odd user interface issues, I went into the Google folder and opened Google Play, and then downloaded and installed the Nook e-reader app for Android. I ran that and was able to synchronize my library of purchased e-books and can now read them using the Nook app for Android running in an emulator on my Macbook. The emulator seems to be a bit hard on the battery – may want to use this solution when you can plug in the notebook computer to AC.

I had the same IP address when I synchronized the Nook library, pointing to something very weird (and possibly very stupid) in Barnes and Noble’s web site operation.

 

 

 

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Google adds #Bluetooth & USB support to Android Things #IOT #InternetOfThings

Android Things is an embedded Android OS for, well, things, as in Internet of Things. Android Things supports connected devices in a wide range of applications.

Source: Google adds Bluetooth APIs and USB support to Android Things Developer Preview 3 | Android Central

Websites Can Track You Online Across Multiple Web Browsers

Researchers have determined a method of tracking individual users across web browsers. That means, changing to a different browser – or even using incognito or private browsing mode – to avoid tracking your online behavior, is no longer sufficient.

The researched identified 36 different properties that can be identified across browsers – some of which, when combined, identify a unique computer user – with 99% accuracy.
Source: Websites Can Now Track You Online Across Multiple Web Browsers

Top programming languages as of December 2016 

  • Java
  • C (but popularity has fallen by half year over year)
  • C++
  • Python
  • Visual Basic .NET
  • PHP
  • Javascript
  • Assembly language
  • Perl
  • Objective-C
  • Ruby
  • Swift
  • Visual Basic
  • Delphi/Object Pascal
  • Go
  • R
  • MATLAB

Main take aways from this list:

Java, C/C++, Python, Visual Basic .Net, C#, PHP and JavaScript are the top programming languages.

Java, however, rates twice as high as C, which is higher than C++. Notably Python has risen to 4th place on the list, and assembly language makes it in to the top 10 at #9.

C and C++, and assembly language, are the languages of the Internet of Things devices (other languages are used too).

SourcE: Tiobe Index

University of Washington: upcoming Internet accessible lecture on #IoT #Wearables Technology

Next Thursday at UW CSE or view remotely:
http://www.cs.washington.edu/events/colloq_info

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
Computer Science and Engineering
COLLOQUIUM

SPEAKER:   David Kotz, Dartmouth College

TITLE:     Amulet: An Energy-Efficient, Multi-Application Wearable
Platform

DATE:      Thursday, December 1, 2016
TIME:      3:30pm
PLACE:     EEB-105
HOST:      Tadayoshi Kohno

ABSTRACT:
Wearable technology enables a range of exciting new applications in
health, commerce, and beyond. For many important applications, wearables
must have battery life measured in weeks or months, not hours and days as
in most current devices. Our vision of wearable platforms aims for long
battery life but with the flexibility and security to support multiple
applications. To achieve long battery life with a workload comprising apps
from multiple developers, these platforms must have robust mechanisms for
app isolation and developer tools for optimizing resource usage.

We introduce the Amulet Platform for constrained wearable devices, which
includes an ultra-low-power hardware architecture and a companion software
framework, including a highly efficient event-driven programming model,
low-power operating system, and developer tools for profiling
ultra-low-power applications at compile time. We present the design and
evaluation of our prototype Amulet hardware and software, and show how the
framework enables developers to write energy-efficient applications. Our
prototype has battery lifetime lasting weeks or even months, depending on
the application, and our interactive resource-profiling tool predicts
battery lifetime within 6-10% of the measured lifetime.

(Featured image: Seattle photo from University of Washington web site at http://www.washington.edu/about/)

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