Verizon, AT&T said to deny sales of Huawei cell phones

Allegedly, both AT&T and Verizon have denied Huawei the opportunity to sell their Honor brand cell phones in their U.S. stores – ostensibly under orders of the U.S. government over security issues regarding China. It sounds, though, that it might actually be about Huawei not cooperating with the U.S. government to spy using Huawei technology vis a vis this item:

The US government was apparently able to negotiate these agreements even with foreign entities by leveraging existing legal regulations. In some cases, officials held up proposed business dealings using the Federal Communications Commission’s oversight of telecommunications. According to the Post, this helped government lawyers in persuading foreign companies to allow the US to maintain such extensive access. It’s unclear just how many companies the US has made these deals with, and for now, the extent of the federal government’s access remains classified.

Huawei also makes Internet switches and is a big competitor to Cisco – in other words, Huawei makes Internet backbone gear.

Source: Major internet backbones required to give US government quick access to data – The Verge

It is clear, at this point, that the U.S. government has the means to spy on everyone, 24 x 7, if they wish. Nothing we do online is secure. Period.

The primary business of the Internet is surveillance

Similar to Uber’s “God View” scandal, Lyft staffers have been abusing customer insight software to view the personal contact info and ride history of the startup’s passengers. One source that formerly worked with Lyft tells TechCrunch that widespread access to the company’s backend let staffers “see pretty much everything including feedback, and yes, pick up and drop off coordinates.”When asked if staffers, ranging from core team members to customer service reps, abused this privilege, the source said “Hell yes. I definitely looked at my friends’ rider history and looked at what drivers said about them. I never got in trouble.”

Source: Former employees say Lyft staffers spied on passengers | TechCrunch

Web site Quartz recently discovered that Google routinely logs quite a bit of information in your Location History, plus uses Bluetooth devices as an additional source of location information – even when you have Location turned off. Even on phones not having a SIM card installed.

Surveillance and privacy violations are the primary business purpose of the Internet.

#Google allows caller ID #spoofing apps to be distributed in #Play Store

Caller ID spoofing enables someone to make it look like they are calling from a different phone number than their own. A smart phone app like this was allegedly used by the alleged “swatter” that resulted in the death of an innocent young father in Wichita, Kansas.

The company that creates this app – Caller ID Faker – Android Apps on Google Play – says it is based in North Carolina.

In the U.S. it is legal to spoof caller ID.

Google’s Android Play Store to start forcing hardware upgrades (basically) #Android #Play

Per ComputerWorld, starting in 2018 and really getting underway by 2019, Android apps in the Google Play Store will be required to target new Android OS versions. Gradually, older phones with older Android OS’s may not be able to run new and updated apps.

The problem is compounded by many phone companies never releasing updated versions of Android, which will have the effect of gradually obsoleting perfectly good smart phones and forcing users to buy new phones.

AccuWeather app continues spying on user’s location #privacy

New tests reveal that while one privacy-invading feature was removed in an app update, the app still shares precise geolocation coordinates with advertisers.

Source: Despite privacy outrage, AccuWeather still shares precise location data with ad firms | ZDNet

This is done without the user’s consent.

Accuweather says it uses one’s location data to provide local weather forecasts but it appears the primary purpose is to optimize ad revenue. A side effect is that a dossier of our movement is constantly maintained by corporations.

With Android, if you use the GPS location features of the phone for any purpose what so ever, Google logs your location in the cloud. You cannot opt out of this – your choice is to use location services and be surveiled by Google, or not to use any GPS location features.

We now use an offline Garmin navigation product which presumably is not logging our location as it is only connected to the Internet a few times per year to update the software. But we really don’t know – may be Garmin is also logging our location albeit with a months long delay.

Android apps secretly listen to your viewed TV commercials 

234 Android apps have been identified as using your phone to monitor TV advertising effectiveness:

The apps silently listen for ultrasonic sounds that marketers use as high-tech beacons to indicate when a phone user is viewing a TV commercial or other type of targeted audio. A representative sample of just five of the 234 apps have been downloaded from 2.25 million to 11.1 million times, according to the researchers, citing official Google Play figures. None of them discloses the tracking capabilities in their privacy policies.

Source: More Android phones than ever are covertly listening for inaudible sounds in ads | Ars Technica

Google spies on you, recording your voice when you are not expecting it to

CCTV surveillance monitoring

Android devices have an “Ok, Google” voice activation feature. This enables voice input of search and other functions on your Android device.

Google also records a copy of the audio when it does this. Google also occasionally records incidental audio having nothing to do with a search. It certainly has for me.

You can manually delete the records, one by one, which is very time consuming. You need to go to this Google page and log in, and then click on Manage Activity and go through Google’s cloud-based storage of your conversations in the past.

Google also records your location as you travel about, and even identifies what businesses or properties you have entered. Google’s Chrome logs every web site and page you visit in to the Google cloud.

In the past couple of weeks, Microsoft has come under fire for its Windows 10 keystroke logger, that when enabled, records you keystrokes and sends those to Microsoft. That means account names, passwords, personal search requests (even if using Tor) and so forth. You can disable their keystroke spying logger by going to Settings | Privacy and switch off the item labeled “Send Microsoft info about how I write to help us improve typing and writing in the future”.

Whenever someone else wants your personal data, you need to ask:

  • who has access to this data?
  • how will this data be stored securely?
  • how long will this data be stored?
  • how will the data being disposed of when it is no longer being stored?

If you do not know the answer to those questions, then you must be leery of donating your personal data to others. This also applies to non-computer world. When you are asked to fill out a paper form with lots of personal data, say to make a credit purchase, you should ask them how they will use the data, keep it secure, and how will they dispose of it?

Similarly, Microsoft’s docs.com web site for publishing and sharing your files makes all files public, by default. The result is that the docs.com search function readily unearths a lot of private data files that users probably do not even realize are posted online. These include school transcripts, medical records, passwords, credit card and other account data, banking statements and more.

THE PRIMARY PURPOSE OF THE INTERNET IS TO SPY ON EVERYONE.

 

 

Apple gets 91% of global smart phone profits

“Apple raked in 91% of of the $9.4 billion profits the global smartphone market generated in the third quarter, according to Strategy Analytics.”

Source: Apple claims 91% of worldwide smartphone profits in Q3: Report | FierceWireless

Astounding. Apple phones are not the dominant product, but Apple manages to collect most of the industry profits.

How to save your Instagram photos and then delete your account

In light of Instagram’s new policy to license out user’s photos for ads, without specific permission or compensation, users are canceling their Instagram accounts in droves: Oh My Tech!: How to delete your Instagram account | The Salt Lake Tribune.

Many are switching to the Flickr.com, which now includes an iPhone photo sharing app.

Update: Instagram co-founder wrote a blog post suggesting they messed up their new terms of service and will make unspecified changes.

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