As tech companies regulate speech, will they lose their safe harbor?

Source: Silicon Valley escalates its war on white supremacy despite free speech concerns – The Washington Post

Tech companies have long argued they are not responsible for the content posted by others on their platforms. Under this view, a tech company is not responsible if someone posts threats to kill others or instructions for building a bomb or details on how to hack into government computers.

Companies have stood behind this principle, especially in regards to users posting defamatory content to online forums. They have argued that they are not responsible for the content and that it would be impossible for them to police the content of their forums.

Now however, the tech companies, including social media companies, are arguing that they can and do police all speech on their platforms. This implies that they do, in fact, control and have responsibility for the speech on their platform. These actions are likely to emerge in future anti-defamation suits filed against online tech firms and they could find themselves liable for all types of infringing speech conducted on their platforms.

Tech companies can certainly condemn offensive speech[1]. But censoring offensive speech puts tech companies into a area that may have legal ramifications.

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Merely having Tor software may be used against you in Court?

In other words, Tor:

Solari said Winner’s laptop also contained software that could enable her to access online black-markets and buy items — such as a fake ID or passport — without revealing her identity or location.

Source: Accused NSA leaker wanted to ‘burn the White House down’ | New York Post

They can make the same allegation about encryption. Attempting to protect your medical, financial and educational records is a sign of nefarious intent?

Every journalist in existence, if they are any good at all, has Tor on their computer. So do private industry analysts reviewing competitor’s products and government policy plans. Tor is a browser that assists with anonymous browsing and accessing web sites as it hides one’s true IP address from the destination web server. There are numerous and valid reasons to use Tor to access publicly available information.

#Microsoft releases #WindowsXP, 8 and Windows Server 2003 patches for #WannaCrype

“WannaCrypt” is the malware that attacked and encrypted computer contents, globally, and then wormed its way through networks to other unpatched Windows computers.

The threat was so large and damaging, that Microsoft has released patches for no longer supported operating systems Windows XP, Windows Server 2003 and Windows 8. Of interest, according to Microsoft, the WannaCrypt malware exploited a previously patched vulnerability in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 and did not have any impact on systems running Windows 10.

For information see the Microsoft blog.

Android apps secretly listen to your viewed TV commercials 

234 Android apps have been identified as using your phone to monitor TV advertising effectiveness:

The apps silently listen for ultrasonic sounds that marketers use as high-tech beacons to indicate when a phone user is viewing a TV commercial or other type of targeted audio. A representative sample of just five of the 234 apps have been downloaded from 2.25 million to 11.1 million times, according to the researchers, citing official Google Play figures. None of them discloses the tracking capabilities in their privacy policies.

Source: More Android phones than ever are covertly listening for inaudible sounds in ads | Ars Technica

Privacy Risks Posed by Data Analytics #IoT #InternetOfThings

Look around your home or office. To the left is a new Amazon Echo. To the right, your Siri-enabled iPhone. Across the hall is a Nest thermostat.And each device is collecting data on you, your habits, and your lifestyle – every minute.

Source: Five Big Privacy Risks Posed by Data Analytics | Bill McCabe | Pulse | LinkedIn

Is spying the primary goal of the Internet of Things? #IoT #InternetOfThings

Our phones track our location, what stores and restaurants we visit, ISPs may track our web wanderings, CCTV and license plate scanners monitor us in public, our expenses are tracked via credit card databases, Android phones log recordings of our voice in the Google cloud – and IoT enables the tracking of what we watch on TV, how often we open the refrigerator door … the primary business model of the Internet is 24 x 7 surveillance.

What do you think of this?

Source: The Whole POINT of the Internet of Things Is So “Big Brother” Can Spy On You | Global Research – Centre for Research on Globalization