#Google allows caller ID #spoofing apps to be distributed in #Play Store

Caller ID spoofing enables someone to make it look like they are calling from a different phone number than their own. A smart phone app like this was allegedly used by the alleged “swatter” that resulted in the death of an innocent young father in Wichita, Kansas.

The company that creates this app – Caller ID Faker – Android Apps on Google Play – says it is based in North Carolina.

In the U.S. it is legal to spoof caller ID.

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#Alteryx publishes detailed data on 123M U.S. households in unsecured, online database

This cloud leak reveals the personal details of 123 million US households, revealing in-depth analysis of their finances sold by credit reporting agency Experian.

Source: Home Economics: How Life in 123 Million American Households Was Exposed Online

123 million households covers essentially everyone in the United States.

The data includes financial information such as income, home and auto loans, number of children and their ages, consumer marketing data such as whether you are a book buyer, engage in gardening, purchase various types of magazines, and many other personal interests, whether you are a do-it-yourselfer, your religious affiliation, household donations made to political groups and environmental groups. The data also includes the balance of your home and auto loans and your address – but not your name. Alteryx pretends that without your name, its not personally identifiable (Alteryx is lying).

Alteryx has not provided any way to learn if your own data has been released through their incompetence.

The CEO of Alteryx, Dean Stoecker, issued a bland statement “Third-Party Marketing Data” that obfuscates the degree of highly personal data they published online. Stoecker is an idiot.

Google spies on you, recording your voice when you are not expecting it to

CCTV surveillance monitoring

Android devices have an “Ok, Google” voice activation feature. This enables voice input of search and other functions on your Android device.

Google also records a copy of the audio when it does this. Google also occasionally records incidental audio having nothing to do with a search. It certainly has for me.

You can manually delete the records, one by one, which is very time consuming. You need to go to this Google page and log in, and then click on Manage Activity and go through Google’s cloud-based storage of your conversations in the past.

Google also records your location as you travel about, and even identifies what businesses or properties you have entered. Google’s Chrome logs every web site and page you visit in to the Google cloud.

In the past couple of weeks, Microsoft has come under fire for its Windows 10 keystroke logger, that when enabled, records you keystrokes and sends those to Microsoft. That means account names, passwords, personal search requests (even if using Tor) and so forth. You can disable their keystroke spying logger by going to Settings | Privacy and switch off the item labeled “Send Microsoft info about how I write to help us improve typing and writing in the future”.

Whenever someone else wants your personal data, you need to ask:

  • who has access to this data?
  • how will this data be stored securely?
  • how long will this data be stored?
  • how will the data being disposed of when it is no longer being stored?

If you do not know the answer to those questions, then you must be leery of donating your personal data to others. This also applies to non-computer world. When you are asked to fill out a paper form with lots of personal data, say to make a credit purchase, you should ask them how they will use the data, keep it secure, and how will they dispose of it?

Similarly, Microsoft’s docs.com web site for publishing and sharing your files makes all files public, by default. The result is that the docs.com search function readily unearths a lot of private data files that users probably do not even realize are posted online. These include school transcripts, medical records, passwords, credit card and other account data, banking statements and more.

THE PRIMARY PURPOSE OF THE INTERNET IS TO SPY ON EVERYONE.

 

 

Cover Oregon software failed due to “ideological blindness” to the organization and management failures

Cover Oregon ran Oregon’s failed online health insurance market; it never enrolled a private individual and is being abandoned in a shift to the Federal HealthCare.gov web service.

The system never worked but insiders refused to believe what they were seeing because a “true believer mentality won out”.

This mind set is common in too many software projects with thoughts like “its just a few problems and will work fine once we get through this”, “we will make up the lost time later”, “the defects are not that serious-they are fixable”, “we can just drop a few features”.

Though the beta site was limited to insurance agents and certified consumer assisters, exchange managers — not unexpectedly — encountered bugs. “On Day 1, agents couldn’t even log in,” Jovick said.

It was the reaction from certain other people in the room that was disturbing.

Troubleshooters for Oracle, the project’s lead vendor, “were flabbergasted” and completely stumped by how the system was malfunctioning, Jovick recalled. Rather than knowing who to call to get problems fixed, Oracle’s reaction was “Huh? How did that happen?'”At that point, no one realized Oregon and Oracle had built “this absolute disaster that just didn’t do anything,” Jovick said.

via Cover Oregon insider Tom Jovick speaks: Health exchange problems stumped Oracle, blindsided staff video | OregonLive.com.

The management team ignored the warnings of many consultants who found “lousy code”, poor testing, lack of test environments, and more.  They were true believers in the ideals of the project and were blinded to what was in front of them.

Oregon ended up enrolling people by hand using paper applications. They lost 20,000 applications and enrolled 4,500 “non documented” immigrants (formerly known as illegal aliens) who did not qualify.

There is a potential that the  Cover Oregon organization be shut down and the staff laid off  (Update: Cover Oregon was shut down after spending about $450 million and never enabling a single consumer to enroll online). From a traditional business perspective, it seems they made need an entirely new organization that is not carrying “emotional baggage”, which is unfortunate for the staff. From a marketing perspective the “Cover Oregon” brand is irreparably damaged and should be replaced.

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U.S. Postal Service logs 100% of all mail sent in the United States

Postal Service computers photograph the exterior of every piece of paper mail that is processed in the United States — about 160 billion pieces last year. It is not known how long the government saves the images.

via U.S. Postal Service Logging All Mail for Law Enforcement – NYTimes.com.

  • Nearly every action you take today is recorded by the Obama regime.
  • The cover of every letter you mail or receive is recorded by the government. No warrant is required by law enforcement to review your postal records. The records have been used to harass citizens because of their political beliefs.
  • The metadata of every phone call you make or receive is recorded by the government.
  • Every text message you send or receive is likely recorded by the government.
  • The to and from addresses of every email you send or receive is recorded by the government.
  • The NSA has a record of every credit card purchase you have ever made.
  • It is likely that every web access you make is recorded by the government.
  • In some cities, even community area sounds are recorded, to pinpoint the sounds of gun shots.
  • The government will maintain a database of how many hours you work each month (this is part of ObamaCare).

What kind of country do you want to live in?