#Microsoft releases #WindowsXP, 8 and Windows Server 2003 patches for #WannaCrype

“WannaCrypt” is the malware that attacked and encrypted computer contents, globally, and then wormed its way through networks to other unpatched Windows computers.

The threat was so large and damaging, that Microsoft has released patches for no longer supported operating systems Windows XP, Windows Server 2003 and Windows 8. Of interest, according to Microsoft, the WannaCrypt malware exploited a previously patched vulnerability in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 and did not have any impact on systems running Windows 10.

For information see the Microsoft blog.

Security and privacy concerns for #IoT #InternetOfThings

In light of the global ransomware attack that took place the past couple of days, this is more true than ever:

  • Securing sensitive data generated by IoT devices is already the top concern of most security professionals (36%).

  • This is followed closely by privacy violations related to data generated by IoT devices (30%).

  • Cyber attacks are also a growing threat as more connected devices join the IoT ecosystem.

Source: IoT Security – Combining Innovation with Protection

Surveys suggest consumers are not that concerned about #IoT security and privacy threats – they should be very concerned!

Android apps secretly listen to your viewed TV commercials 

234 Android apps have been identified as using your phone to monitor TV advertising effectiveness:

The apps silently listen for ultrasonic sounds that marketers use as high-tech beacons to indicate when a phone user is viewing a TV commercial or other type of targeted audio. A representative sample of just five of the 234 apps have been downloaded from 2.25 million to 11.1 million times, according to the researchers, citing official Google Play figures. None of them discloses the tracking capabilities in their privacy policies.

Source: More Android phones than ever are covertly listening for inaudible sounds in ads | Ars Technica

Bose headphones said to spy on your audio listening #Bose #IOT #InternetOfThings #Privacy

The audio maker Bose, whose wireless headphones sell for up to $350, uses an app to collect the listening habits of its customers and provide that information to third parties—all without the knowledge and permission of the users, according to a lawsuit filed in Chicago on Tuesday.

Source: Bose Headphones Secretly Collected User Data – Lawsuit | Fortune.com

The primary business model of the Internet, and by corollary The Internet of Things, is surveillance. This NBC News report describes many other devices that have been surveying their customers habits. As spying on customers becomes routine, it seems the only thing they’ve done wrong was fail to disclose their spying to the customers. Since most people do not read privacy agreements, most companies may legally spy on their customers, as long as it is disclosed.

Improving industrial efficiency using #InternetOfThings #Iot sensor technology

Reno startup Filament is gearing up for high-scale production. The startup recently closed a $15 million round of new venture financing. The capital will allow Filament to scale manufacturing

[Their tech is designed to upgrade legacy industrial systems]

First, the device can physically connect to the machine if it has a diagnostic port. Second, the technology can monitor the environment around the infrastructure. Their devices can monitor temperature, humidity, light, sound pressure level and accelerometer movement. Lastly, the devices can provide a large-scale network in areas where there is little or no cellular service or WiFi.

Source: Reno-based tech startup Filament secures $15M in venture financing | nnbw.com

This is a great area of opportunity – enabling the monitoring of legacy equipment. Some times, just knowing the variation in temperature and humidity can be an important piece of information on a manufacturing line, or in an HVAC system or what ever your system process is.